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theduisbergkid

Questions about cleaning a black car, from a friend, not me.

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So much info for my friend, not me, to take in here.

OK, he needs a washmitt, two buckets, some shampoo of some sort (autoglym, right ?), then what about the wax ?

Keep it simple, please, he's a bit of a mong.

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Sounds like it. Just take it to a decent detailer every 6 months.

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Bring it to my office on any Friday of your choice (every week if you want) and you can drink tea or coffee, sit in reception reading the array of classic car magazines that are there for my customer's delectation whilst it is looked after by our valeter. All he asks is £7 and has OCD which is a great affliction for a car valeter to have. All ask is that you don't use the toilet.

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I'd go Megs Gold Class for the shampoo myself. Wax; a whole workd of pain and possible expense. You might do well to post a question about wax to Nathan in the Cleaning forum.

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I have tried lots of car shampoos, my money would go on Dodo juice every time.

The paintwork is a bit swirly on your car, super resin polish or Autobalm will hide this. Top with a wax, use Collinite. It's not the best but it's cheap, leaves a good finish, lasts for ages and comes in a proper old school tin (I have a feeling this could be the important bit).

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Ok, my Porsche cleaning routine.

Halfords:

Wash mitt

Meguires NXT car shampoo

1 bucket

Meguires NXT spray wax

Microfibre drying towel

Microfibre polishing cloths

Off Internet:

Poorboys black diamond polish...

Sonus microfibres drying towel...

Wash car with water, bucket, shampoo and mitt. Rinse well with free running hose, not spray.

Dry with micro fibre towel.

Use Poorboys black diamond polish to shine up paint and hide quite a lot of the inevitable swirl marks.

Spray on NXT wax. Wax off.

Check out shiney black Porker...

4e2y8eqy.jpg

Job done.

+++

Edited by DanG

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Bring it to my office on any Friday of your choice (every week if you want) and you can drink tea or coffee, sit in reception reading the array of classic car magazines that are there for my customer's delectation whilst it is looked after by our valeter. All he asks is £7 and has OCD which is a great affliction for a car valeter to have. All ask is that you don't use the toilet.

£7 ?! Oh yes ! My friend will even bring his own mags. +++

Dan, that looks good, and a nice simple run-down on how to do it. Ta. :)

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My friend will even bring his own mags. +++

Maybe it's best if you do let TDK's uuh, friend use the toilets instead of doing that in reception :uhoh:

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Ugh!! I don't want you slipping any of your "specialist interest" magazines inside our Classic and Sportscar mags thank you very much!

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Ugh!! I don't want you slipping any of your "specialist interest" magazines inside our Classic and Sportscar mags thank you very much!

I can be trusted to behave, besides, if you look in Classic and Sportscar Magazine you might find one of my stories anyway +++

ETA - My friend, not me.

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Check out collinite insulator wax it's a fairly cheap wax that goes on really easy and lasts for ages, lots of people use it over winter because of how long it lasts +++

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Check out collinite insulator wax it's a fairly cheap wax that goes on really easy and lasts for ages, lots of people use it over winter because of how long it lasts +++

That's my weapon of choice +++

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Collinite for the Phantom A3. +++

My summers are being refurbished as we speak and will be layered up before they go on. My [new] winters had two coats of Autoglym Super Resin Polish and four coats of Poorboys Wheel Sealant before they went on in November. Makes it very easy as the wheels come clean with a gentle sponge, less time faffing about when its freezing cold outside, doubly handy on the S4 with zero clearance to get your hands inside with the size of the front discs and the rear disc protectors. You easily make the time back. Heavy Audis are dire for brake dust. Also means you never need to use a wheel brush which scratches the surface which only makes the brake dust stick faster, a negative spiral!

The Sportbacks alloys were refurbished Sept 2011, planning to take them off over Easter to clean the insides properly and rewax them.

Edited by Ian_C

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My friend has just been to Halfords, bought a microfibre washmitt thing, a microfibre drying towel, two new buckets, and some Meguirs shampoo/condition stuff in a tub. He has, somewhere, some Meguirs 'gold' polish that he has never used. He resented spending £30+ on that lot so didn't buy the wax yet.

Stupid question #986123 - polish then wax, or wax then polish ?

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Polish then wax. You, sorry he, could just wax* but polishing first will make the waxing bit a lot easier.

* the car. Not yourself. Sorry, himself

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Agreed, no point waxing a dirty car. Would recommend Autoglym Super Resin Polish first. Piss easy to apply, its liquid rather than solid

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Your friend needs to remember the absolute certainty that for the car to look sharp attention to detail is required.

Clean first, proper clean and then put the make up on, polish and wax over dirt, tar splash, bug brains and the like isn't a good idea. If he does a panel a day, two at the weekend- a week later it will look as nice as it by his hands.

If he lives in a clay rich area he could rub soil over the bodywork as a pre clean, anyway that's what Milo told me claying a car was..

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What a nightmare, two buckets, expensive shampoo, stupid microfibre teatowel thing. An afternoon's work;

Right, my friend gets the washmit thing, he understands that. Sponges trap crap. That's clear. My friend bought two buckets, for the two bucket system, then forgot which bucket was which and mixed them up. Then - after washing, and a gentling hosing down, the car looked pretty good, probably thanks to the previous owner's efforts. Then the teatowel thing, it just pushed the water around, my friend resisted using a chamois leather which would have soaked everything up. It took two f*cking hours to get this far, and that's not touching the interior, nor the wheels. Two ****ing hours. All time my friend, not me, is thinking about the B6047 and that fantastic couple of kinks leading up to Tilton-on-the-hill and the off camber corner coming back, and how much fun that would be, instead of fannying around with an oversized teatowel like some OCD afflicted weirdo. Anyway, it looked OK when finished, but my friend couldn't be arsed to spend more time polishing and waxing it, so he went for a long hard drive, shat the car up as bad as before, and abandoned it on the driveway.

This is going to be difficult - for my friend. Not me (etc).

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Black cars are a pain in the arse, personally, i'd just drive it, wash it occasionally, and pay someone to sort it properly once a year!

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Best way to dry a Porsche is to head for the B6047 and nail it.

Of course, when you get back, it's dirty again. So you can spend a very pleasant, if somewhat repetitive, day :coffee:

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DSC02863_zpse0656017.jpg

Oh, that is lovely. You...r friend should be pleased with that.

Now, get out and make it dirty again +++

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I saw an immaculate 928 on someones driveway today, on a private plate but must have been one of the last, stunning thing, would dearly love to own one, but they are allegedly massive money pits and horrendously unreliable, which isn't what you'd expect from a Porsche?

What's the 968 like in that respect?

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image as above

What a coincidence - your friend has a 968 as well!! :roflmao:

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