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Mort

Cool Porsche film

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Looks very tidy, presumably it's like Trigger's broom though - would be interesting to know what (if anything) hasn't been restored.

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Love the 356.

Stories of people dropping £100k on restoring these with 'original parts' these days.

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Lovely. Those bumpers spoil the lines a bit though.

 

 

I wonder how many modern cars are capable of 1 million miles.

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I wonder how many modern cars are capable of 1 million miles.

Anything that's had similar amounts of time and money spent on it.

It's had it's engine rebuilt on average every 250k miles, not that impressive when you look at it like that, there are some Volvos out there with over a million miles on original engine and gearbox with (allegedly) no rebuilds whatsoever.

Still a nice old car though, much more interesting to drive than any modern box.

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I would imagine the whole thing has been replaced over time, bearings, gearbox rebuilds, rubbers, fuel tank, electrics - the works.

 

Whilst the engines are '60's tech, and as simple as a Beetle engine, I am very sceptical about just 3 rebuilds.

 

Maybe just 3 full, nut and bolt, rebuilds, but there will have been plenty of top end rebuilds (new pistons and cylinders) across that time frame.

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Do you think?

Admittedly my knowledge of Porsche engines is limited, but I wouldn't have thought 250k between full rebuilds was unreasonable, even for something from the 60's? Air cooled so less to go wrong?

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Oil cooled. They're bloody oil cooled.

#pedantmodeoff

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Oil cooled. They're bloody oil cooled.

#pedantmodeoff

Do they run with oil coolers then?

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My mates old Turbo had oil coolers in the front and hence due to the long run to the rear, it was a lot of pipe work and oil.

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Yes they do.

Engine mounted and, on the Carrera models, front mounted.

Similarly, early 911s only had engine mounted coolers initially, then after compression was increased, front mounted coolers were brought in - specifically on the S versions.

Even the early G series (2.7) cars went without front cooling in the basic 911 guise although they did muck about wih the number of fan blades for a number of years before sticking to 11....

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So what we're saying then, is yes, they are air cooled.

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Guess what I saw on Saturday walking past some railway arches near Tower Bridge.

Some 356's- the owner suggested the soft top was worth £75k. He reckoned parts were really easy to source, and the best renovations are the US cars. Not because of the sun, but the roads (mostly) being straight highways there's little stress on the cars and that helps over 50+ years.

On the parts he said that 95% are still available stock next day! which I thought a bit optimistic.

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post-5924-0-62239300-1381862899_thumb.jp

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California also doesn't use salt on its roads so those are also favoured - but a rust free Cali car is the stuff of myth as none of these had any rust protection really.

Parts readily available but the real beardy folk will only use OEM.... Zzzz

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So what we're saying then, is yes, they are air cooled.

 

You could say that, but on that basis every car is air cooled.  Air passes through the radiator and cools a working fluid, thereby cooling the engine.

 

Whereas all (?) modern cars use water as the working fluid, lots of the Porsches that are described as air-cooled use oil as the working fluid.  Which makes sense as oil is cheaper, less viscous, and less dense than water... oh... wait...

 

I think the early Beetles were genuinely air-cooled, in that air was ducted past metal cooling fins on the engine?  Not so sure where the transition between that and an oil-cooled 993 turbo is, though.  

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Even beetle engines have an oil cooler built into the fan housing.

The same fan blows air over the cylinder pots and heads which are finned and ducted for additional cooling help.

Exactly the same as 911 engines.

Later the engine, the more the front end cooling. So in a 993 there are 2 proper radiators with electric fans along with engine mounted cooler and also gearbox mounted gearbox oil cooler.

On earlier cars a simple trombone style loop in the right hand wheel arch and oil pipes along the sill provided additional cooling.

I'll get my anorak.

+++

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You could say that, but on that basis every car is air cooled. Air passes through the radiator and cools a working fluid, thereby cooling the engine.

Whereas all (?) modern cars use water as the working fluid, lots of the Porsches that are described as air-cooled use oil as the working fluid. Which makes sense as oil is cheaper, less viscous, and less dense than water... oh... wait...

I think the early Beetles were genuinely air-cooled, in that air was ducted past metal cooling fins on the engine? Not so sure where the transition between that and an oil-cooled 993 turbo is, though.

Exactly, I was 'out pedanting' Eldavo!

The only way an engine wouldn't ultimately be air cooled was if it had a water/oil heat exchanger, but even then, the water would need somewhere to dissipate the heat!

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