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I'm not a techie but we have just completed a build for a rather large PC manufacturer's laptops and the guys that are techies were sort of bemused by it I think. I gather there are no common components between Metro and Desktop meaning double development. I think the desktop was referred to as a sort of Vista equivilent in their view of the uptake and feeling by the public.

As I said, I'm not a techie,so they might have said something entirely different which I heard as the above ...

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Interesting, i've got a media centre which is about 6 years old now, it runs windows 7 ok (Was originally Win XP MCE 2005) but have a few issues with TV tuners and the like, I wonder if it's worth borrowing a disk from work and upgrading it?

We've installed it on one of the bosses laptops this week but haven't really had a look at it yet, i'll go and take a peek later +++

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  • 1 month later...

Windows 8 Pro – available to download from 26th October for only £24.99 (Pre-order by October 24th and get free shipping.* Starting October 26th, you'll also have the option to download it for £24.99)

Microsoft Store Online Store - Welcome Topcashback...Microsoft Store: Microsoft Software Purchase 15.15%

The upgrade can also be purchased for £14.99 if you got a Windows 7 PC between June 2012 and end of Jan 2013. Don't be clicking this link and pretending that you've only just purchased your computer as that would be naughty (and theft!).

Remember, if you are a student / teacher then your uni may be part of the Dreamspark program and you might be able to get this and a lot of other MS stuff for free anyway.

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I'm running a full version of Windows (not an upgrade) and I don't like the idea of 'losing' it by upgrading to W8. (I'd pass it down to an older laptop/PC still running XP/Vista.) I was thinking I might wait and see how much a full version of W8 is. But £24.99 exc TCB is very appealing.

Now, the price of the Surface - that isn't so appealing! :(

So, let's say I bought a new PC the other week. What sort of proof do MS require to process the £14.99 upgrade??? :secret:

After customer registration and Microsoft validation, customers will receive a registration confirmation email.
Edited by Sponge
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Question:

I've got Windows 7 Ultimate (64 bit) running under Parallels Desktop on my Macbook Pro (OSX 10.7.5).

I only use it for astronomy related software that controls my scope (cos in astronomy they're a bit backward and all the software is ancient and never available for Mac's).

Under my environment, I should be able to do the download/upgrade no differently to any other, yes? I'm a bit out of touch on the Windows side of things as I rarely use it these days. Or, is it a bit pointless anyway. To be fair I have no speed issues with Windows 7 for what I use it for (if you saw the software, you'd know what I mean, its roots go back about 17 years to the early days of Visual Studio and well before .NET development came to the fore).

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So, let's say I bought a new PC the other week. What sort of proof do MS require to process the £14.99 upgrade??? :secret:

When you sign-up to the offer they ask for you existing Win 7 key.

But presumably the £24.99 is an upgrade price and not for a new install?

I see your point. With the 'Windows 8 Upgrade Assistant' (W8UA) you really must have an existing INSTALLED license to do the upgrade; the W8UA cannot read your license key from a bit of paper; it will not ask you to type an existing key in.

However, if you have multiple computers to upgrade there maybe an option to select download ISO option and burn to USBstick or DVD as there won't be a full retail version of the OS; anyone wishing to purchase that will have to buy the OEM edition.

Customers will be able to purchase a downloadable version of Windows 8 Pro. An optional installation DVD is available for an additional fee, plus shipping and any applicable taxes or duties. Customers can also choose to create their own installation media on DVD or USB media after downloading Windows 8.

You could clone your current Win 7 installation then upgrade one of those to Win 8 just to be on the safe side.

(don't take my answer as fact, as I haven't seen the W8UA)

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Saying Windows 95 was **** and '98 good is just a way to make the above look more comical, wasn't actually true at the time. Also, what about NT4, Windows 2000 etc?

NT4/2000 is stable as anything, still see it out live & running stuff now.

I like 2000 - my business laptop was still running it in 2008. We're on XP now, but I'd tweaked it to look like Windows 2000. Can't stand the later 'Fisher Price' Windows UI.

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NT4/2000 is stable as anything, still see it out live & running stuff now.

Windows 2000 Server is perhaps the most stable operating system I've ever encountered - and I include anything in that.

I see it and SBS 2003 systems running all the time - flawlessly. I had an old client who had a Windows 2000 Server that had total uptime of over 6 years. Not a single reboot or power down in that time - and it wasn't a high spec server either. It was running everything in a company of 100-120 employees (fair enough, small) but it was one of the few places I'd ever gone to where nobody had a single IT complaint.

In our old offices we ran SBS 2003 for 5 years with no software hiccups at all.

Contrast that with a company I spoke to in West Sussex last week who'd gone from SBS 2003 to SBS 2011 - and were having nightmares. Their IT Manager is wishing he'd never had the idea changing - and they did a clean installation too, not an upgrade. I suspect he's fecked something up, but it still speaks volumes for their server sided OS's in the early part of this decade. They were bloody good.

p.s. there's a story in that too - half the problems with OS's aren't OS's at all. They're the idiots who don't know how to install them properly or try running old software on them. It installs and 'appears' to work - but then it fecks everything up and they wonder why it doesn have a compatibility sticker on it. Same as half the IT issues I've ever seen. They're not IT issues. They're user issues.

p.p.s. the best desktop system from Microsoft is undoubtedly Windows 7. Superb. I'm a total Mac convert now but I'd acknowledge Windows 7 is a fantastic system.

Edited by MrMe
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I like 2000 - my business laptop was still running it in 2008. We're on XP now, but I'd tweaked it to look like Windows 2000. Can't stand the later 'Fisher Price' Windows UI.

I did the same with XP, but I quite like W7 except for Word which has lost all the useful menus at the top. Looks pretty, but ease of use jumped out the window (arf).

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I think people will like it once they see the whole point of one design over all devices. It works really well. I'll admit I didn't like it too much to start though.

Incidentally, did anybody watch the launch yesterday? Talk about cringe worthy, dull, and boring :smashfreak:

Microsoft are on a roll at the minute. They've some properly cool stuff coming out - probably more in the corporate playground than consumer, although consumer is looking pretty strong too.

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