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Racking up a premium rate call whilst on the net?


Ari
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Friend of mine found a premium rate call on her phone bill, something like 5 mins and nearly £15! Apparently it turns out a member of her family accessed a premium rate dodgy Internet site (without realising it was premium rate presumably) and hence the premium number on her phone bill.

But I can't see how thats possible. Surely if you're dialled into the net and lets say the number you're dialled in on is 0845 123456, how, whilst connected to that number, can you be racking up a call charge on another number? confused.gif

Surely to rack up a bill to a premium number you'd actually have to dial that number? crazy.gif

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No, no, there are lots of nasties out there. Some are very malicious and actually alter your connection settings whilst others put a shortcut on your desktop saying something like "XXX Clips" or whatever. The shortcut is for a dial-up connection routed through a premium number blush.gif

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I'd heard of programs re programming your dialler to dial up a premium rate line when you connect, but didn't think it was possible to be connected to a premium rate line whilst already effectively on a call. crazy.gif

This is on a dial up connection obviously, not broadband...

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It couldn't start chargin premium call rate whilst already in a call. It would have to disconnect and redial. The problem is that if someone went on the site and clicked "yes" to "do you want to install this software" then they can't claim to be completely faultless. frown.gif

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[ QUOTE ]

It couldn't start chargin premium call rate whilst already in a call.

[/ QUOTE ]

Well thats exactly what I thought... confused.gif

And if it had reprogrammed the modem to dial up through a premium rate number then surely it'd keep doing it till it was sussed out, not just one 5 minute call? crazy.gif

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Well, we think it was her teenage son, who denies all knowledge of course. Then this theory has surfaced that whilst on an "inquisitive" web search he "accidently" found himself on a premium rate web site.

I personally find it hard to believe that clicking onto a web site can trigger a premium rate call. Hence my personal suspicion that maybe someones curiousity extends a little further than the Internet... UHOH7.GIF

Hence my question of whether an Internet web site could in fact trigger a premium call.

Tempted to get the number and just ring it, if there is any speach there then it aint a web site doing it! sekret.gif

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im pretty sure you cant make a premium rate call, whilst already dialed into to your isp.

more likely a completely seperate call, or there is one or more premium rate dialers on the system.

check network connections and see if there is more than one dial up account.

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Ari, my old pineapple, I know there's nothing more irritating than some wise-ass smugly reciting "Google is your friend" in reply to every question, but, er, how can I put this,

BBC News 'Search' function is your friend

See also this one

And, via the dreaded googling,

Google really IS your fr...

Leading to:

This - very relevant

They all mention code that disconnects from your current line and reconnects to premium rate.

Presumably if the darling little tyke disconnected via the icons at lower right on the Windows taskbar, and then (somehow) figured out what was happening and got rid of the dialler, your friend would have only got stung for the 5 minutes rather than every subsequent call.

beerchug.gif

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Get the Sunday times today.

There is a 4/5 page article saying what is happening and ways to stop it. Might be on their website if you have a look.

I helped a friend out with something similar. Her charges were well over £100. In their case it was a virus that was calling the dialup connection even though they were on broadband.

So this is what I told them to do.

NEVER leave the phone connnection plugged in to a PC just in case. Or at least until they had done the following.

-Install a good Anti Virus Product. AVG is free and very good.

-Ensure that you have a good firewall. This will stop a lot of programs of any sort getting out of the PC without them allowing it too. ZoneAlarms again is free for the home user and very highly rated.

- Install Ad-aware / Spybot to get rid of any other dodgy things that are trying to comunicate with the outside world and run it once a week.

After doing this they haven't had any more trouble. AVG did find a virus and they have registered the number on their bill with ICTSIS. She has little hope of getting the money back in reality, but this should stop it happening again.

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Ari here (in a dress! grin.gif)

I had a look on her dial up thing and there was a connection on there called "xxxdailup" or something. Guessing that was the one. Plus some other connections she didn't recognise. Deleted them now.

Her PC is pop up hell though, with XXX pop ups every few seconds, and thats just coming straight onto Tyresmoke. mad.gif

Will the AGV virus jobby get rid of this, and where do we fing it? (Guessing a quick Google will answer that last one).

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Look, we've discussed the suspenders thing, they're just for comfort, nothing more... sekret.gif

Downloading AVG as I type, by god it's slow on Dial up! Only another hour to go., ho hum...

Trying to use Tyresmoke at the same time is pushing it to the raggedy edge of its performance envelope too, about 5 mins to load each page!

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Sounds like she has more to worry about than just viruses, make sure you do the SpyBot thing etc. as well, to stamp out trojans and things (including those pop-ups!). If they've been downloaded "with user permission" from a website, they won't necessarily be classed as a virus and spotted by AVG (unless it has specific anti-trojan/spyware functions built in).

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Yegads (re. Times letter) - that's absolutely true, isn't it ? These fraudsters haven't come into your house and pinched the money, they're actually having it collected FOR them by the phone company, who are therefore complicit. That's brilliant, I never thought of that!

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Right, back home now! 169144-ok.gif

Ye gods but her computer is slow! smashfreakB.gif

Downloading AVS on dial up was no picnic either.

Ok, so I've run the AVS and it found 96 trojans and infected files, mostly trojans (must have been about 80 of those!!)

I've left it defragging as well as it's never ever been done so that might help it run smoother, I don't know.

Do I need to run Spybot as well?

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