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vw754

Torque settings A3 (8P) 2006

16 posts in this topic

Im after the torque settings for the A3 tdi sportback,its for the rear hub bearings im about to replace.

Ive ordered aftermarket ones as they were a way lot cheaper,audi say all a3's have different settings and cant/wont tell me.

Have you guys any ideas?

chassis starts with wauzzz 8P94................ 2.0 TDI SPORTBACK WITH 30MM REAR HUB BEARING.

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I have been told by a local AUdi (main dealer) they all differ but for my A3 it 200 nm and then tighten a further 180 deg......ok but why another 180 degrees why not set the torque wrech a little higher?

Also will i need new hub bolt? i was planning on using the same ones (im doing both rear bearings) but adding some thread lock to the bolts,are they the stretch type.?....is it a must to replace?

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I have been told by a local AUdi (main dealer) they all differ but for my A3 it 200 nm and then tighten a further 180 deg......ok but why another 180 degrees why not set the torque wrech a little higher?

Also will i need new hub bolt? i was planning on using the same ones (im doing both rear bearings) but adding some thread lock to the bolts,are they the stretch type.?....is it a must to replace?

200Nm PLUS 180 degrees is not 'a little higher', it could equate to as much as 300Nm, or much more, depending on the fastener length, thread type and 'hardness' of joint. Plus, what torque wrench do you propose using ? If it's the common 'click' type, DO NOT set it to click at 200Nm and just wind it on 180 degrees. The 'click' at 180Nm as you hit the backstop of the wrench will give a huge whack of uncontrolled torque. You need a bending beam style wrench and a protractor. I doubt you'll have one. Don't use an airtool either, as these are as accurate as Mystic Meg. The reason for the extra angular rotation is because there is almost certainly stretch in the bolts, the 180Nm will 'seat' the fastener' correctly, the extra 180 degrees will apply a very specific amount of clamp force (and residual tension) in the joint. You need new bolts, and the fact that Audi have specified a very specific pretension (torque + angular rotation) tells me this isn't a job to have a stab at yourself.

Sorry, pet topic of mine, quick answer = get a main stealer to do it.

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Rich, is every torqued bolt on every car set wrong then? I've never seen a 'bending beam' torque wrench in a garage, they all use the click type, and bits aren't falling off cars left right and centre.

Maybe in high precision applications I can understand your concerns, but on a car, is a normal click type wrench not good enough? I cant say I've ever felt as if mine is putting 'uncontrolled' torque through whatever I'm tightening?

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Rich, is every torqued bolt on every car set wrong then? I've never seen a 'bending beam' torque wrench in a garage, they all use the click type, and bits aren't falling off cars left right and centre.

Maybe in high precision applications I can understand your concerns, but on a car, is a normal click type wrench not good enough? I cant say I've ever felt as if mine is putting 'uncontrolled' torque through whatever I'm tightening?

I totally agree!

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Rich, is every torqued bolt on every car set wrong then? I've never seen a 'bending beam' torque wrench in a garage, they all use the click type, and bits aren't falling off cars left right and centre.

Non-critical joints (and those that require aftermarket access, such as wheelnuts) have simply a minimum torque. A click wrench is pretty good at applying a minimum torque, but there is zero control over the maximum torque they apply. The factory don't use bending beam types of course, for a torque+angle joint (like the one mentioned) they use an electric nutrunner with torque and angle control. As I mentioned earlier, if a spec is torque+angle, it isn't a 'home mechanic' job.

Maybe in high precision applications I can understand your concerns

This is a high precision application. This joint is designed to have a very specific residual load, there is no other reason the factory would specify a torque+angle setting. It also indicates you need new bolts. The factory may well have specced a lubricant or locking agent on the thread too I reckon. This also will have a huge influence on the residual load.

I totally agree (with Tipex)

Because it's the answer you want to hear ? Fine. Do it yourself. I don't care :rolleyes:

Jesus! Where did that come from?? :)

From supplying the highest accuracy torque and load measurement instrumentation to every car/engine factory and R&D facility in Europe, opening torque measurement and calibration laboratories in the UK, France, Sweden and the Czech Republic between c.'94 and 2000. :coffee:

Edited by theduisbergkid

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Most torque wrenches are click type and would recommend using one!!!!! The angular torque is that it stretches the fastener which is the most important part and should be done with a rigid bar! Like i said PM me i can sort exact torque etc if thats what you would like.

Norbar are an exceedingly good quality and very accurate troque wrench.......they seem to hold their settings year after year when calibration is due -every 6 months

Edited by TIDYDUBS

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Rich, is every torqued bolt on every car set wrong then? I've never seen a 'bending beam' torque wrench in a garage, they all use the click type

*bored whilst waiting for TG to start*

Garages don't build cars though. They reassemble bits. Click wrenches are not widely used in European/US car factories, although the japs still use them. We (UK/EU) tend to a use a very precise DC powered tool to apply the correct amount of torque. Japs use an impulse tool (airtool v similar to the impact tools used by kwikfit and sold by machine mart etc, but with oil filled chamber to 'soften the blow') which fastens the bolt much more quickly, but with less accuracy, so they have a 2nd step of using a click wrench to assure the minimum torque was achieved. Japs aren't very good at controlling torque and angle to achieve a specific residual load. +++

*Yay, TG is starting*

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Most torque wrenches are click type and would recommend using one!!!!! The angular torque is that it stretches the fastener which is the most important part and should be done with a rigid bar! Like i said PM me i can sort exact torque etc if thats what you would like.

Norbar are an exceedingly good quality and very accurate troque wrench.......they seem to hold their settings year after year when calibration is due -every 6 months

Click wrenches should not be used for torque+angle applications, because they cannot control the upper torque applied. You need a beam or dial wrench for that part. Like this...

dialwrench.jpg

MHH or Norbar are amongst the best analogue ones, I agree, companies I know well.

Boring myself now. Sorry chaps.

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'S ok, I was genuinely interested in why you said what you did, wasn't being argumentative for the sake of it.

So if he took his car to a dealer, do you honestly think they'd do it any differently to what he'll do himself, i.e. click type torque wrench up to the correct figure, plus 180deg?

You'd probably shat yourself and never venture in one of my cars again if you saw the Aldi torque wrench I use!

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So if he took his car to a dealer, do you honestly think they'd do it any differently to what he'll do himself, i.e. click type torque wrench up to the correct figure, plus 180deg?

My experience was with factories and R&D facilities, I have no idea how rigorously the dealerships follow the rules, they're supposed to follow the factory spec and using a click torque wrench is simply the wrong tool for the job. The dial wrench I pictured is a common tool and would most likely be what they would/should use, in conjunction with a protractor.

You'd probably shat yourself and never venture in one of my cars again if you saw the Aldi torque wrench I use!

Ha ha :)

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just to update,all the mechanic ive spoken to...say we use a normal torque wrench....some say we dont torque the hubs tighten them and thats it........that comes from audi/vw specialist,he says weve never had a problem or had anyone come back with issues or complaints.Would you guys recommend torque the hubs or not?:eek:

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If the manufacturer specifies a procedure, it should be followed, ultimately only you can decide if your happy to do otherwise.

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